Cam Newton on Our Nation Being Beyond Racism & His Critics Not Being Racist

Dec 20, 2015; East Rutherford, NJ, USA; Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton (1) runs with the ball against the New York Giants during the fourth quarter at MetLife Stadium. The Panthers defeated the Giants 38-35. Mandatory Credit: Brad Penner-USA TODAY Sports

Dec 20, 2015; East Rutherford, NJ, USA; Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton (1) runs with the ball against the New York Giants during the fourth quarter at MetLife Stadium. The Panthers defeated the Giants 38-35. Mandatory Credit: Brad Penner-USA TODAY Sports

Cam Newton has a pretty interesting outlook on the alleged racial divide that has plagued our country during a recent interview with GQ.

Newton is now in a tax bracket that will pretty much shield him from of the blatant types of racism in this country, and that possibly why he made these statements on America being past racial divide.

Check out what Cam had to say about it.

The Charlotte Observer, a wonderful newspaper that’s kept its lights on during this di∞cult time for newspapers thanks in part to reactionary complaints about Cam Newton.

Reactionary—or, as Cam’s longtime backup quarterback Derek Anderson has put it, “flat-out racist.” An honest question: Can you name a contemporary athlete who has been subjected to more veiled and sometimes outright racism than Cam Newton? Is this even a controversial opinion, to think that Cam lives in a world of coded and not-so-coded critiques that basically boil down to resentment about the existence of such a sublime black quarterback?

According to Cam Newton, yes, actually. It is. “I don’t think of it like that,” he says. Shaking his head softly.

Do you feel like football fans are racist toward you?

“It’s not racism. Everybody’s entitled to their own opinion.”

So if it’s not that, what is it, do you think?

“I’ll let you be the judge. I don’t look at it like that. I look at it like some people have certain beliefs, and I have my own belief, and we can agree to disagree on certain things. But this is what makes sports so amazing, that we can start a discussion around a table, in the newspaper, in the magazines, that will get people’s attention. And that’s what sports does.”

In January, right before the Super Bowl, you said: “I’m an African-American quarterback that may scare a lot of people because they haven’t seen nothing that they can compare me to.”

“I don’t want this to be about race, because it’s not. It’s not. Like, we’re beyond that. As a nation.”

You really think so?

“Yeah. I mean, you bring it to people’s attention. But after that, that’s it.”

It is an interesting answer, but one that is likely to gain him more critics than fans in his own community, and highlights some of the comments made by Michael Bennett.

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